How to port-forward Parsec

This goes over the port forwarding process for Parsec specifically. Note that this is time-consuming and there's room for error, you should probably only do this if you know what you're doing.

Before following this article, you should go through the 6023 article to ensure you don't have a double-NAT or carrier-grade NAT, as those will prevent port-forwarding from working on your network.

Getting the necessary info and accessing the router

  • Press Windows key + R, type cmd /k ipconfig /all, and press Enter
  • Take note of the Physical Address, IPv4 Address and Default Gateway, which will be used in the tutorial

ipconfig.png

  • To access your router settings, enter your Default Gateway IP (in my case, 192.168.0.1) in your web browser
  • Enter the user and password. Google for the default login info for your specific router model

    routerlogin.png

Checking UPnP is activated

Search through the router's menus for UPnP (Universal Plug and Play). Make sure it's turned ON. There might also be a list there; if you see Parsec on it, it suggests it's likely working properly.

UPnP automatically sets up port forwarding for you. Only proceed through the rest of this article if you suspect UPnP isn't working in your case.

Setting up manual port forwarding

Part 1: Set up DHCP

Search through the router's menus for DHCP. When you find it, look for something similar to Address Reservation, IP Binding or Static Lease.

When you find it, you might see fields with names similar to the ones below (to make a new one, you might need to click Add or something similar). The names and general organization of the section varies a bit from router to router.

  • IP Address or Reserved/Ipv4/Assigned Address: Set to your IPv4 Address (from the first section of the article); in my case it's 192.168.0.100)
  • MAC Address or Physical Address: Set to your Physical Address (from the first section of the article); in my case it's 70-85-C2-04-E1-5F)
  • Name: Put whatever you want or leave it blank. It's not an issue if your router doesn't have this

After that, save and reboot your router.

Part 2: Open ports

Search through the router's menus for Port Range Forwarding, Port Forwarding, Virtual Servers, or something similar.

When you find it, you might see fields with names similar to the ones below (to make a new one, you might need to click Add, or something similar). The names and general organization of the section varies a lot from router to router, so don't be weirded out if some of these below are not in your router; it's not an issue.

  • IP Address, Local IP or Internal IP: Set to your IPv4 Address (from the first section of the article); in my case it's 192.168.0.100)
  • External IP: Leave it blank or unaltered
  • Protocol: Set to UDP or All / Both
  • Name: Put whatever you want or leave it blank
  • External Port, Service Port or Start/End Port:
    • If you're the client, set it to 9000
    • If you're the host, set it from 8000 to 8010. If you can't set a range of numbers (or aren't sure), make multiple rules for each number (see situation B below). You don't need to go up to 8010 in this case, each person that joins will use 1 port starting from 8000 (e.g. for 4 people, do up to 8003)
  • Internal Port or Internal Start/End Port: Set it to the same port as above

Here's an example of how it might look like for the host (for the client, it's just 9000)

bjunch.png

When you're done, go to Parsec at Settings > Network, set everything like below, hit Save and restart Parsec.

7pbiw4.png